Anton Skyba photography

Dr. Valentina Ksenofontova, head of the neurology department at Maryinka Central Hospital in Krasnohorivka, helped carry immobilized patients to safety when the facility was shelled in June 2015. ©©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

In June 2015, explosive weapons destroyed the ambulance garage of the Krasnohorivka ambulance substation and left a burned ambulance in the far right bay. Fire also damaged the adjacent neurology building of Maryinka Central Hospital (left). ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Dr. Victor Zinchenko of the Krasnohorivka ambulance substation stands in front of a damaged garage with scorched ambulance. He explained that the use of explosive weapons has often made it too dangerous for ambulances to reach residents in need. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

In September 2016, Maryinka Central Hospital in Krasnohorivka depended on water that staff members carried from a well in bottles and buckets. At that time, the hospital had been without running water for about two years. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

The Krasnohorivka ambulance substation relied on this stove for heat in temperatures that dropped to -2 degrees Celsius. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

An explosive weapon penetrated the road in front of this home in a neighborhood of Krasnohorivka. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Explosive weapons shattered dozens of windows in the main building of Avdiivka City Hospital. In 2015, the hospital abandoned the building and moved all of its operations to a second, smaller building, where they remained in September 2016. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Empty benches stand outside a wing of Avdiivka City Hospital that was abandoned aftertwo direct hits by explosive weapons. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

The pharmacy at Avdiivka City Hospital was closed when damage from explosive weapons shut down the facility’s main building. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016The pharmacy at Avdiivka City Hospital was closed when damage from explosive weapons shut down the facility’s main building. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Empty beds and stretchers line a hallway in Avdiivka City Hospital, where damage from the use of explosive weapons has hindered the provision of health care. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Aleksandr Pasternak, chief engineer at the Avdiivka Coke Plant, described how explosive weapons damaged tubes that carried heated water from the plant to Avdiivka, forcing the hospital to treat patients in frigid conditions. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Workmen repair water mains near Avdiivka City Hospital in September 2016. Shelling has often presented obstacles to repairing damaged infrastructure in the east of Ukraine. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

The painted word “shelter” marks the way to a protected section of Maryinka Central Hospital in Krasnohorivka. Medical personnel and patients usually took cover in the hospital’s basement during the worst of the shelling. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

The use of explosive weapons has hindered Maria Bero’s access to proper health care for her young daughter who has cerebral palsy. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

A woman in the frontline village of Starohnativka shows a photograph of her home, which was partially destroyed by explosive weapons. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Due to loss of heat, frequent power outages, and the risk of errant shells, Granitne Ambulatory Clinic limited its operations to this room, which used a wood stove for warmth. One doctor referred to the conditions as “a disaster.” ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Dr. Lyudmila Bagmut, executive doctor and pediatrician at Granitne Ambulatory Clinic, braved heavy shelling to reach work every day during the height of the armed conflict. On at least two occasions, shelling kept her from reaching the clinic. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

Explosive weapons knocked out Granitne’s telephone station, located in the town post office, on one of the first days of the armed conflict. The loss of the station made it more difficult for residents to communicate with the hospital or ambulance station. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016

ASAP volunteers Dr. Igor Maidenko and paramedic Aleksey Turchak provided care to military personnel and, when time allowed, civilians along the contact line in September 2016. ASAP’s services have helped fill a gap left by the decrease in availability health care. ©Anton Skyba for International Human Rights Clinic at Harvard Law School and PAX/September 2016